Denver Airport Paintings & Secrets Explained

Denver Airport Murals Paintings Order Out of Chaos

DENVER, CO – Horrific murals line the walls of Denver International Airport, however, most travelers fail to notice the Denver Airport Paintings or their sinister meanings. Upon closer look, one must wonder why such artwork is on display in a public place such as an International Airport? After reading this article you may look at the Denver airport murals in a very new light.

The Denver Airport Paintings always give me a creepy feeling anytime I find myself at DIA. And it’s not just the art, but the whole Denver airport conspiracy that really makes me wonder and open my eyes when I find myself in Colorado.

The images shown in this article are far from soothing and came at a cost to Colorado taxpayers in the amount of $100,000. The symbolism shown below is surely unique.

Order of Chaos

This mural has me at a loss for words, titled “Order of Chaos” could this be a sign of times to come? We see a military figure that resembles a German SS soldier wearing a gas mask with a machine gun in one hand and a sword stabbing a dove in the other.

The dove, a symbol that has been used in post-war peace movements shown being stabbed doesn’t sit well with this author, not sure about you?

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-On the left side of the mural is a mother holding a dead baby with hundreds of other mothers lined up doing the same.

-In the right lower corner (you can barely see it in the photo) is a piece of paper containing an actual poem written by Hama Herchenberg a 14-year-old who died in a Nazi concentration camp.

The letter is, a chilling reminder of events that happened less than 100 years ago:

DIA Hama Herchenberg

“I once was a little child who longed for other worlds
but I am no more a child for I have known fear
I have learned to hate how tragic, then, is youth
which lives with enemies, with gallows ropes.
Yet, I still believe I only sleep today. that I’ll wake up,
a child again, and start to laugh and play.
Hama Herchenberg, died December 18, 1943 Auschwitz Concentration camp”.

Denver Airport Mural Images

Denver Airport

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Aside from the forest and city burning, children laying in coffins and animals that seem to be extinct these seem to be nice pieces of artwork created by Leo Tanguma a Chicano muralist.

New World Airport Commission

Denver Airport New World Sign

Smack dab in the middle of the DIA terminal lies the cornerstone show above. Upon closer look the words reveal themselves to possible sinister things to follow as stated by the New World Airport Commission.

DIA Corner Stone New World Order 2094

Should we start talking about what’s under the base?

Denver Underground Airport Tunnel
 

Denver Airport Conspiracy Theories

Colorado is a funky place this day, especially at the Sunrise Ranch Cult in Loveland Colorado.

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6 Comments on "Denver Airport Paintings & Secrets Explained"

  1. It’s important to note that the mural artist for this work has Mexican heritage. The great Mexican muralists like José Clemente Orozco, Diego Rivera, Jorge González Camarena, and David Alfaro Siqueiros all put the brutality of humanity on display for all to see. Their work demands the viewer to never forget the power of greed, hatred, and oppression.

    Murals of even more graphic nature are painted on the walls of government buildings all over Mexico, including the Presidential Palace. The equivalent would be if you walked into the White House and saw brutal murals depicting native American genocide, the horrors of slavery, the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr, the twin towers collapsing, and so on.

    The purpose is to make sure we as a society never forget our history or our capacity to inflict suffering upon our fellow man. It also reminds us of our ability create change and fight for what’s right.

  2. Graphic murals depicting war, death and destruction in an airport? The one percenters seem to have a particular fondness for shocking others with their depravity and then daring us to call them on it. I can’t think of any reason this other than to acclimate the public to such gruesome images.

  3. John Peter Gill | October 17, 2015 at 10:47 AM | Reply

    After v isiting Dallas for the 2015 JFK conference I have been routed back to The U.K.> via Denver I thought I would look at these being a fan of Alex Jones And a Conspricy Realist,Will I make it Home?,Watch this space,Looking at these Murals it reminds me of Iran and the situation in the world today and if I see henry Kiissenger or Either Clintons in there I know iam in trouble,Watch this space

  4. You should research the tunnels… and barb wire fences…

  5. I think these paintings and murals are being displayed in VERY poor taste. I certainly wouldn’t want my child to be freaked out by them. I plan to never use DIA again and believe me, I’ve used them quite a bit. It’s worth my money to go around and avoid it completely. SICK

  6. Terrible things happen. The worst you could do is turn away from them, pretend they never happened, or take away that moment of thought and reverence for the people who suffered through them. Every moment in human history is valuable to the development of humanity as a whole, and turning away from images too “horrific” to contemplate, will result in a humanity that won’t even recognize how awful and terrible it can be so that it may never be that way again. I read that letter by Hama for the first time because of this, and I am both saddened and glad to have been called to attention on the existence of something so poignant that I may have never read, something so incredibly sad that it made me wonder what good I could do for a humanity so riddled with ailments that continue to be shoved under the proverbial rug. Don’t blame the messenger for bringing to the light all of those ugly things, blame the shortcomings of humans in general, and hope to your gods that the future that you create will not end with murals so full of pain and strife.

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